Jun 18, 2013

Posted by in Articles, Zecharia Sitchin | 1 Comment

Planet X Incoming and the Mysterious Death of Dr. Robert Harrington

Planet X Incoming and the Mysterious Death of Dr. Robert Harrington

dr-bob-harrington

 

Planet X and the Mysterious Death of Dr. Robert Harrington

YOWUSA.COM, 22-May-2008
John DiNardo, Janice Manning
nibiru incoming photo

 

 

 

 

Dr. Robert S. Harrington, the chief astronomer of the U.S. Naval Observatory, died before he could publicize the fact that Planet X is approaching our Solar System.

Many feel his death part of a cove-up? One in which government agencies quickly moved to conceal the most earth-shaking discovery in history. If so, the search for truth begins in New Zealand.

In 1991, Dr. Robert S. Harrington, the chief astronomer of the U.S. Naval Observatory, took a puny 8-inch telescope to Black Birch, New Zealand, one of the few viewing points on Earth optimal for sighting Planet X, which he definitively calculated to be approaching from below the ecliptic at an angle of 40 degrees.

PDF Download: The Location of Planet X by R. S. Harrington, October 1988 (Yowusa.com Subscribers Only)

However, the source below quotes Dr. Harrington as predicting 30 degrees, not 40.

The Independent, September 18, 1990
Lexical priming and the properties of text, quotation of British newspaper,

Dr Harrington says the most remarkable feature predicted for Planet X is that its orbit is tilted 30 degrees away from the ecliptic, the main plane of the solar system, where all previous searches have concentrated. His models also predict a greater distance from the Sun, about 10 billion miles, or between two or three times as distant as Pluto.

By analyzing time-lapse photographs using the “blink comparison” technique, originated by famed Pluto discoverer, Clyde Tombaugh, Dr. Harrington proved that Planet X was indeed inbound into our Solar System. Harrington sent back reports of this ominous discovery, but died of what was reported to be esophageal cancer before he could pack up his telescope and come home to hold what would have been a highly publicized press conference.

The source below indicates that Harrington began the search at Black Birch in April, 1991, two years before his death. However, considering the painstaking process of trying to find a distant needle in a very large haystack, two years is not much time at all.

The Independent, September 18, 1990
Lexical priming and the properties of text, quotation of British newspaper

In April (1991) the new sweep starts in earnest at the Black Birch Observatory in New Zealand. A modest 8in telescope, similar to that used by Mr Tombaugh, will examine the northern part of the constellation Centaurus. Pairs of photographs of the same region of sky taken on successive nights will be sent to Washington. Using a blink comparator, a device that compares two photographs, Dr Harrington hopes to locate any faint object that has moved during the interval between the two pictures.

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  1. Josephine Smith says:

    I hope the good aliens will assist us in this.

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